Outreach

“The cosmos is within us. We are made of star stuff. We are a way for the universe to know itself.”

– Carl Sagan

Photo Credits: Maartje Meesterberends Fotografie


I believe science belongs to all of humanity, and should be shared and enjoyed by everyone. My research is not meant only for me, or for the scientific community, it is meant for anyone who is curious about it. I am very passionate about the popularisation of science and I have had the opportunity to lead and participate in several science outreach projects.


Two telescopes in a field pointing at the clear evening sky.

During my undergrad studies I co-founded and led an Astronomy Club at Barcelona University. Our main mission was to stimulate interest for the cosmos in people both within and outside of the university. We organised seminars, workshops, and astronomical camping trips, where we could share the wonders of the universe. Seeing someone look through a telescope for the first time is an incredible experience.

While doing my Master’s I started a weekly cosmology Q&A livestream on the platform Periscope (I have since moved to Happs), where anyone in the world can interact and ask me questions about science and cosmology, without needing a background in science. I get lots of different questions in these livestreams – some have even led to intense discussions among my colleagues. These questions motivated me to start an outreach blog, where I provide more in-depth answers and explanations. Click on the photo to watch one of my broadcasts!

Close-up image of me in the middle of an explanation, with my hands waving in front of me.
Panel of seven men sat on sofas around a coffee table.

During my Ph.D. at RWTH Aachen I started a second weekly broadcast in the department’s name, which I usually hosted with one other colleague as a guest. This allowed us to discuss many different research topics and answer more questions. I even managed to get the more senior professors involved in the livestreams!

In March 2017 my science outreach efforts led me to do something I never thought I would be able to do: I got up on a stage in front of over 400 people for a three-minute science slam. This was part of the FameLab Germany competition. Although I did not make it to the finals, I really enjoyed the experience. Later that year I was invited to do this science slam again as a presenter at the NEMO Museum for Night of Museums in Amsterdam.

Screenshot from the game DarkMaster showing different coloured circles moving through the universe.

Finally, in the last year of my Ph.D. I supervised a Master student in a project aimed at developing a game for smart phones, intended to bring cosmology to more people. The resulting game, DarkMaster, is available in both the Play Store and the App Store, and comes packed with cosmology facts.

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